Friday, November 10

Small Animal

Dr. Teresa DeFrancesco
8:00am | "Mitral Valve Disease- How to Manage After EPIC Study"
This lecture will focus on the staging and treatment of dogs with preclinical mitral valve disease (MVD). We will discuss a landmark clinical study (EPIC study) of dogs with preclinical mitral valve disease and heart enlargement receiving either pimobendan or placebo. 

9:15am | "Cough & Dyspnea- Is It Cardiac or Respiratory"
Differentiating cardiac cause vs. respiratory cause of cough and dyspnea is challenging. As a cardiologist, my approach is to rule in or rule out heart failure as I am working with these cases. Unfortunately, there is no single diagnostic test for heart failure; the diagnosis is largely a clinical diagnosis that is based on history, physical exam and results of diagnostic tests. We will review the keys to a timely and accurate diagnosis.

10:10am | "Update on Management of Heart Failure: Focus on Treatment"
The most important recent advancement in canine and feline heart failure management is the addition of an ino-dilator, pimobendan. We will touch on other components of medical management such as diuretics, vasodilators and anti-thrombotics in cats.

11:15am | "Approach to a New Murmur in a Cat"
One’s approach to the diagnostic work up of an asymptomatic cat with a murmur is highly dependent on its age. We will review the etiologies and indications for proBNP, bloodwork, echocardiogram, chest radiographs and blood pressure. 


Dr. Russell Tucker
1:20pm | "What is that Lung Disease?"...Diagnostic Pulmonary Patterns and Correlated Pathology
Commonly encountered pulmonary patterns in small animal practice will be discussed in a practical and clinically useful presentation, illustrated with histopathologic correlations using case-based examples. Attendees will discover that frequently confusing radiographic lung patterns are simplified by the association of pulmonary patterns in anatomic correlation to the histopathology of thoracic diseases.

2:30pm | "Urinary Tract Imaging with Case-based Illustrations"
Urinary tract disorders are a common clinical presentation in small animal practice, yet the radiographic features of urinary tract diseases or dysfunction can be challenging to accurately interpret. This presentation will discuss the principles of urinary tract radiographic interpretation and offer clinically useful tips and techniques, including urinary tract positive and negative contrast procedures. Clinical examples of urinary tract disorders and diagnosis will be presented using case-based illustrations.

3:30pm | "What's Your Diagnosis?" Challenging Abdominal Radiographic Diagnosis

Interpretation of abdominal radiography is frequently challenging or inconclusive in veterinary patients. This interactive discussion will cover practical interpretation tips and diagnostic considerations for several challenging and complex diseases of the abdomen in small animals. Attendees will gain confidence and efficiency in recognition of diagnostic radiographic findings using common cases with challenging and confusing clinical presentations.


Equine

Dr. Craig Shoemaker 
Sponsored by Boehringer Ingelheim
8:00am
 | "Rethinking PPID: Characterization of Early vs. Advanced Disease"

9:00am | "Tick Bourne Disease: What We Know & What We Want to Know"


Dr. Megan Burke

10:15am | "Colic "
This hour will encompass a general review of equine colic, focused on evaluation and treatment of colic in the field, as well as in a referral setting. A case based approach will be used. The discussion will focus primarily on ways to maximize outcomes before and after referral for some common causes of both medical and surgical colic

11:25am | "Septic Synovial Stuctures"
This hour will focus on common presentations for contaminated synovial structures, as well as strategies for diagnosing and treating this condition. The talk will be focused around discussion of several "real-life" clinical cases and will discuss not only how these cases are managed in a referral setting, but also provide some "tips and tricks" for managing these cases in the field when referral is not an option. Additionally, we will discuss prognosis, as well as the commitment in both time and money that owner's should be prepared to invest if their horse is diagnosed with a contaminated synovial structure. Audience participation in the case discussion is strongly encouraged!


1:30pm | "Esophageal Obstruction"
During this hour we will briefly review field management of simple obstructions, but will focus mot on those cases that are initially refractory to traditional management. Conservative and surgical management of complex obstructions, and a discussion of short and long term complications and outcomes will be the focus of the 2nd portion of the talk. A case based approach will be used to encourage audience participation.


Dr. Noah Pavlisko
Sponsored by Virginia-Maryland College of Veterinary Medicine

2:40pm | "Drug Shortages and Alternative Approaches to Equine Anesthesia" 
Drug shortages are becoming more frequent making it difficult for veterinary professionals to gain access to necessary anesthetic drugs.  This lecture will review some other drug options for when your favorite anesthetic agent becomes unavailable.
 

3:35pm | "Tramadol and Gabapentin for the Management of Chronic Pain" 
Chronic pain management in horses is complex.  This lecture will review the latest literature on Gabapentin and Tramadol in the management of chronic pain.  
  



Public Practice

Dr. Lindsey Garber

8:00am | "Overview of National Animal Health Monitoring System"
The National Animal Health Monitoring System (NAHMS) works to provide national-level estimates of animal health and management practices for the U.S. This session will provide a broad overview of the system including how the data are collected, how we address the diversity of industries and data needs, and the usefulness of this data to practitioners, university researchers, extension specialists, and livestock producers. If you are wondering what NAHMS is or how it works, this session will give you all the details. 

9:00am | "Highlights from the National Animal Health Monitoring System's Recent Studies"
How is the U.S equine population changing, and how prepared are owners for an aging population? How are daries utilizing veterinarians? What is the USDA doing to collect information on antimicrobial use or resistance? This session will explore highlights from recent NAHMS studies including the Equine 2015 study, the Dairy 2014 study, and several others. We will also discuss future work and how you can help shape the data we collect.


Dr. Julia Murphy and Jennifer Cromwell
10:15am | "Overview of Rabies in Virginia & the ORV Barrier"
The epidemiology of animal rabies in Virginia and as well as the typical response to rabies exposures will be reviewed. In addition, Virginia's efforts to address rabies issues in Appalachia will be discussed.

Brian Stanely, Jennifer Cromwell, Dr. Julia Murphy and Dr. Rebecca Beamer
11:25am | "Panel Discussion: Overview of Rabies in VA & the ORV Barrier"

Dr. Wanda Wilson
1:30pm | "FSIS NARMS: Antimicrobial Drug Resistance Monitoring of Foodborne Pathogens in FSIS Produsts"
The Food and Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) is the public health agency inn the U.S Department of Agriculture (USDA) responsible for ensuring that the nation's commercial supply of meat, poultry (e.g., young chickens and turkeys), and egg products (e.g.,liquid eggs) are safe, wholesome, and properly labeled. Within the FSIS mission, the agency examines the hazards and risks associated with FSIS-regulated products to reduce human exposure to foodborne pathogens and prevent foodborne illness. As such, FSIS collaborates with the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) to monitor and characterize foodborne pathogens and bacteria isolated from humans and animals to identity patterns of resistance in antibiotics of human health concern through the National Antimicrobial Monitoring System (NARMS) surveillance sampling program. This session will review FSIS surveillance programs that monitor changes in antimicrobial susceptibility of pathogens and commensal organisms recovered from different points in the food production system and demonstrate how this information is used to inform public health.

Dr. Jackie Smith
2:40pm | "Rabies in Kentucy: A 25 Year Retrospective"
Rabies is a zoonotic disease of mammals that has a worldwide distribution. The virus is 100% preventable with a vaccine, yet is 100% fatal if not caught in time. This talk covers the rabies virus, its distribution, and specifically a look at rabies testing, results, and distribution in Kentucky from 1989-2016.

3:35pm | "GIS in Veterinary Diagnostic Epidemiology" 
GIS use in the veterinary arena is not a new concept. However, using javascript and geojson programming, we can mine diagnostic data to produce interactive web maps that update automatically in near real-time. This produces an on-demand product for veterinarians and producers to use as a situational awareness tool of what is going on locally and state-wide in our animal population.


Practice Management
Dr. Mark Russak
Sponsored by Boehringer Ingelheim

8:00am | "Practice Success in Any Economy: Tips & Plans to Pave the Road to An Outstanding Practice"

o   Utilizing the Four Core Communication skills; Non-verbal Communication, Open-ended Questions, Reflective Listening and Empathy to get the client to “yes”

o   How to enhance the client experience; paving the road to success in the practice: including the physical surroundings, personal introductions, barriers to open communication, and utilizing appropriate body language

o   How key staff roles and appropriate staff utilization and leveraging contribute to success

o   Understanding the Key Practice Financial Indicators(KPIs) of a successful practice and how they contribute to the bottom line of the practice and personal financial success

o   The relationship between good medicine and good business

10:15am | "Practice Success in Any Economy, Cont.."

11:25am
| "Practice Success in Any Economy, Cont.."


Dr. Caitlin DeWilde
Sponsored by Boehringer Ingelheim

1:30pm | "Socially Speaking : An Overview of Social Media Platforms?"
We'll take a brief look at each of the major social media platforms (Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Pinterest, etc) and discuss their user demographics, veterinary usage statistics, and ideas for content to help connect with your clients wherever they "socialize."

2:40pm | "Supercharge Your Social Media and Client Engagement"
Already rocking your clinic’s online presence? Take it to the next level with these new and innovative ideas to help your online activity run more efficiently, more effectively, and build your business! We’ll touch on new opportunities including Facebook Live and new social media channels, new post and video ideas, a brief look at targeted advertising, and ways to improve your search engine ranking.

3:35pm | "Protect our Clinic's Reputation Against Cyberbullying"
Ready to protect your clinic and avoid problems before they arise? Attendees of this lecture will learn:

1) Concrete steps to implement across social media channels to prevent cyberbullying attacks

2) Safeguards to establish limit or regulate outsider access to publishing content on your pages

3) Alert and notification systems to enable so you can be notified of negative activity instantly

4) Recommendations for monitoring and responding to online reviews- both negative and positive

5) Strategies to encourage more positive reviews, feedback and online traffic



Saturday, November 11

Small Animal

Dr. Tom Chamberlain
8:00am | "Periodontitis: A Biofilm Disease"
Periodontal disease is the most common disease diagnosed in veterinary hospitals and affects approximately 80% of cats and dogs by the age of 2 years. Periodontitis is a chronic infection and multifactorial inflammatory disease process of the soft and mineralized tissues surrounding the teeth. Progression is associated with subgingival bacterial colonization and biofilm formation that provokes chronic inflammation of soft tissues and resorption of alveolar bone. Successful treatment is achieving long-term periodontal stability and this requires a commitment between the owner and dental clinician. Treatment modalities include non-surgical and surgical protocols. Monotherapies, including systemic antibiotic use (i.e. pulse antibiotics) for periodontal disease control, are unsuccessful and inappropriate. A review of periodontal anatomy, periodontitis etiology, control and prevention will be presented.

9:15am | "Endodontic Disease: Diagnosis & Treatment"
Endodontically compromised teeth are a common clinical occurrence in dogs and cats. Early recognition and treatment is important to the patient. Along with pertinent anatomy, the fundamentals of endodontic disease diagnosis, treatment options and techniques will be discussed. 

10:10am | "Synopsis for Important Oral Disease Problems"
Based upon the referral cases we see and some of the questions we field by telephone from the primary care veterinarians, there are several relatively common oral diseases of felines and canines that have aspects that are often misunderstood and worth having increased awareness and knowledge of. A variety of these conditions will be presented and discussed.


Dr. Kathleen Ham

11:15am | "When Does Thyroid & Parathyroid Disease Become Surgical?"
This session will review the pathophysiology of both primary hyperparathyroidism and thyroid neoplasia, endocrine diseases that are surgical. Topics that will be discussed include key concepts in the diagnosis and work-up of these diseases. The treatment techniques, goals and outcomes will be reviewed. 

1:20pm | "Decision Making with Adrenal Tumors"
This session is geared towards adrenal masses and will review the pathophysiology of these tumor types. The diagnosis and pre-surgical treatment will be discussed. Additional topics include the incidental finding of an adrenal mass, surgical decision making, goals and outcomes.

2:30pm | "How to Help the Brachycephalic Dog"
This session will aim to review the pathophysiology of brachycephalic obstructive airway syndrome. The attendees will understand methods of treatment including medical, emergent and surgical. Finally, we will discuss the role of client education and advocating for our brachycephalic patients. 

Dr. Mark Remick
3:35pm | "NVAP Module 23: Use of Antibiotic in Animals"

After completion of this module, you will be able to

  • describe mechanisms of antimicrobial resistance in general terms;
  • define antimicrobial stewardship;
  • evaluate key factors for selecting an appropriate antibiotic;
  • describe the benefits and limitations of various antibiotic susceptibility testing options;
  • locate and interpret antibiotic labels for the purposes of informed therapeutic decision-making;
  • apply the key components of the Animal Medicinal Drug Use Clarification Act (AMDUCA) to making 
    decisions about antibiotics;
  • list the agencies involved in regulating antibiotics and monitoring antibiotic resistance and residues; and
  • locate information to assist in making decisions on antibiotic use in animals.


Equine

Dr. Russ Tucker
8:00am | "Equine Diagnostic Radiographhy & Ultrasonography: An Anatomic Review"

A review of the basics of equine distal limb radiography and ultrasonography, including interpretation of common radiographic and sonographic findings, will be enhanced by several special tricks and tips applicable to daily veterinary practice.

9:00am | "Challenging Equine Cases"
Challenging case presentations will be used to illustrate the indications and limitations of radiography including special projections, ultrasonography, scintigraphy, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging.


Dr. Mark Remick
10:15am | "NVAP Module 19: Animal Health Emergency Response"
Upon completion of this module, an accredited veterinarian will be able to

  • identify the various roles and organizations or agencies in which veterinarians may assist in animal health emergency responses;
  • describe the basics of response planning and coordination, including the National Incident Management System (NIMS) and the Incident Command System (ICS); and
  • locate additional training resources pertaining to animal health emergency response.

Dr. Michelle Barton

11:25am | "Review of Normal Equine Gastrointestinal Ultrasonography"
Normal ultrasonographic anatomy of the equine gastrointestinal tract will be reviewed using three dimensional quick time virtual reality animations that depict the plane or slice of the anatomy in each view.  Normal real time images and video clips will also be incorporated.

1:30pm | "The FLASH Technique for Equine Acute Colic"
FLASH stands for Fast Localized Abdominal Sonography of the Horse and is a “spot" method of ultrasonographic examination used to aide in the diagnosis of colic and can generally be completed in 10 minutes.   The key areas of examination will be reviewed along with examples of abnormalities in each area.

2:40pm | "Guide to Auscultation of Murmurs in Horses"
Normal heart sounds and the most common murmurs of horses will be reviewed using phonocardiographic recordings that were captured from electronic stethoscope recordings from patients.   The differential diagnosis of cardiac murmurs will be discussed. 

3:35pm | "Guide to Auscultation of Arrhythmia's in Horses"
Normal variations in heart rhythm and the most common pathologic arrhythmias of horses will be reviewed using phonocardiographic recordings that were captured from electronic stethoscope recordings from patients.   The differential diagnosis of arrhythmias will be discussed. 


Public Practice
Dr. Mark Remick
8:00am | NVAP Module 3: Overview of Foreign Animal, Program & Reportable Diseases.
Upon completion of this module, you will be able to

  • define foreign animal, USDA Program, and reportable diseases;
  • describe the safeguards that help prevent FADs from entering the U.S.;
  • outline the steps in a foreign animal disease investigation;
  • list the USDA programs for controlling or eradicating diseases in various species of livestock and poultry;
  • recognize the additional training opportunities available to accredited veterinarians;
  • report foreign animal and reportable diseases; and
  • locate additional resources and learning opportunities.
9:00am | NVAP Module 4: Preventing Disease Introduction & Spread
After completing this module, you will be able to
  • describe disease prevention practices that limit exposure to animals and humans;
  • select job-appropriate PPE to minimize zoonotic disease exposure and fomite spread;
  • implement appropriate cleaning protocols and select effective disinfectants for different situations;
  • implement basic biosecurity practices for veterinary clinics, animal shelters, and livestock facilities; and
  • access additional resources for infection control practices including appropriate PPE selection.

10:15am | NVAP Module 19: Animal Health Emergency Response
Upon completion of this module, an accredited veterinarian will be able to

  • identify the various roles and organizations or agencies in which veterinarians may assist in animal health emergency responses;
  • describe the basics of response planning and coordination, including the National Incident Management System (NIMS) and the Incident Command System (ICS); and
  • locate additional training resources pertaining to animal health emergency response.

11:25am | NVAP Module 7: Foreign Animal Disease Detection in Category 1 Animals
Upon completion of this module, you will be able to

  • report a suspected foreign animal disease (FAD);
  • describe the important role of accredited veterinarians in surveillance and detection of FADs;
  • realize the potential impact a FAD in a Category I animal could have on food animal populations, public health, and the economy;
  • list the zoonotic FADs presented in this module; and
  • recognize clinical signs of key FADs in Category I animals.

1:30pm | NVAP Module 11: Sheep and Goats: Disease Awareness & Health Certificates
Upon completion of this module, an accredited veterinarian will be able to

  • list common diseases of sheep and goats and identify those that are zoonotic;
  • list the four requirements that must be met for USDA to officially recognize a scrapie genotype test;
  • understand the differences in the National Scrapie Eradication Program and the Scrapie Flock Certification Program;
  • explain the types of official identification required for international and interstate movement of sheep and goats; and
  • identify common errors on completed International Health Certificates and Certificates of Veterinary Inspection.

2:40pm | "NVAP Module 18: Avian Influenza & Newcastle Disease"

Upon completion of this module, you will be able to

  • realize the economic and public health impacts of an exotic avian disease outbreak;
  • recognize the clinical signs associated with avian influenza (AI) and Newcastle disease (ND);
  • describe concerns associated with H5 and H7 low pathogenic AI viruses;
  • understand the roles of the National Poultry Improvement Program (NPIP) Avian Influenza Clean and Monitored programs and the Live Bird Marketing System program in preventing avian influenza (AI);
  • collect and submit samples for the surveillance of AI and ND;
  • report positive results for AI or ND and understand the protocol for investigation, response, communication, and recovery; and
  • implement biosecurity measures specific for these diseases.

3:35pm | "NVAP Module 23: Use of Antibiotics in Animals"

After completion of this module, you will be able to

  • describe mechanisms of antimicrobial resistance in general terms;
  • define antimicrobial stewardship;
  • evaluate key factors for selecting an appropriate antibiotic;
  • describe the benefits and limitations of various antibiotic susceptibility testing options;
  • locate and interpret antibiotic labels for the purposes of informed therapeutic decision-making;
  • apply the key components of the Animal Medicinal Drug Use Clarification Act (AMDUCA) to making 
    decisions about antibiotics;
  • list the agencies involved in regulating antibiotics and monitoring antibiotic resistance and residues; and
  • locate information to assist in making decisions on antibiotic use in animals.

Technician

Dr. Teresa DeFrancesco
8:00am | "Sedating & Anesthetizing the Cardiac Patient"
Most sedatives and anesthetic drugs have some direct or indirect cardiac or respiratory effect. Patients with cardiac disease may not have the reserve to compensate for these effects. In a case based format, we will review the risk v. benefit ratio for various sedation and anesthesia protocols. 

Susan Clark, LVT, VTS (ECC)
Sponsored by Veterinary Referral & Critical Care
9:00am | "Critical Care Nursing"
Many technicians underestimate the value of good nursing care. Understanding proper monitoring of critical patients, and being able to anticipate a patient’s needs could truly mean a difference between life and death. 

10:15am | "Recognizing & Monitoring the Painful Patient"
No technician wants her patients to be in pain. We will discuss the different symptoms of pain, the benefit of a pain score system, and treatment choices for dogs and cats.

Drs. Dirsko von Pfeil & Kendall Bourke
Sponsored by Friendship Hospital for Animals
11:25am | "Bandaging Tips & Tricks"
This lecture and wet-lab provides clinically useful information for application of several bandages, splints, and casts. Tips and tricks to make bandaging an effective treatment with reduced risk for development of complications are provided. 


Lauren Bennett, LVT
Sponsored by Animal Dentistry & Oral Surgery
1:30pm
 | "There's Nothing Numb About it- Nerve Blocks & How They Can Help Your Patients"
Advantages and disadvantages of nerve blocks for our patients. What techniques and agents are best to use with nerve blocks.

Jenn Bozic, LVT
Sponsored by Animal Dentistry & Oral Surgery
2:40pm | "Is that Normal? Recognition of What is Normal Versus Abnormal in the Oral Cavity"

Do you know what is normal in the oral cavity? be able to identify abnormalities in the oral cavity based on knowledge of what is normal. recognize the importance of dental radiographs, dental charting, and treatment of oral cavity abnormalities to ensure your patients are receiving the best care possible.

Michaela Meissner, LVT
Sponsored by Animal Dentistry & Oral Surgery
3:35pm | "What's in a Name? Feline Tooth Resorptive Disease & Stomatitis"
The lecture will review two oral diseases of the feline: Tooth Resorption Disease and Feline Chronic Gingivo-stomatitis.  Etiology, diagnosis and treatment options are a few of the topics that will be discussed. 





Sunday, November 12

Small Animal

Dr. Cassidy Rist
Sponsored by Virginia-Maryland College of Veterinary Medicine
8:00am | "A Comparative Prespective on Lyme Disease"
this presentation will provide an overview of the current state of the science in Lyme disease diagnosis, pathology, and treatment among humans and animals; and discuss the ecology of Lyme and other emerging tick-borne diseases in the United States.

9:00am | "Advancing Veterinary Knowledge on Lyme Disease in the Potomac Region"
Human cases of Lyme disease are increasing in the Potomac region, but what do we know about the patterns of disease in our canine companions? this presentation will discuss ongoing research at the Virginia-Maryland College of Veterinary Medicine on Lyme disease, and offer an opportunity for private practitioners to get involved.

Dr. Angela Kargus
10:05am | "Introduction to Working with the Media"
Veterinarians often underestimate the role the media can play in helping them communicate with current – and potential – clients. Seminar attendees will learn how to develop a key message, give an effective media interview, and how to effectively utilize select social media platforms. There will also be a discussion on handling emotional and controversial industry topics in the public arena.

Those completing this seminar will be able to:

  • Understand how the media has changed in recent years
  • Be prepared and strategic about telling their government’s story
  • Use social media effectively
  • Plan a communication strategy
  • Respond to unwelcome media attention
  • Give an effective interview
  • Improve communication style
  • Cultivate relationships with traditional media
  • Focus on key messages

Equine

Dr. Maureen Kelleher
Sponsored by Marion duPont Scott Equine Medical Center
8:00am
 | "Making the most of Your Orthopedic Examination & Diagnostics"
A discussion different diagnostic analgesia patterns and the best imaging choices based on diagnostic analgesia results.  When to refer cases for second opinion and/ or advanced imaging and the selection of advanced imaging options.

9:00am | "Integrative Therapies in Equine Sports Medicine"
Overview and benefits of different integrative therapies such as acupuncture and chiropractic/ spinal manipulation. 

Dr. Nathaniel Koval
Sponsored by Veterinary Services APHIS-USDA
10:05am
 | "High Health High Performance Horses- What This Means for Equine Practitioners"

11:45am | "Preparing for the 2018 World Equestrian Games in Tryon, NC"


Public Practice

Dr. Cassidy Rist
Sponsored by Virginia-Maryland College of Veterinary Medicine
8:00am | "A Comparative Prespective on Lyme Disease"
this presentation will provide an overview of the current state of the science in Lyme disease diagnosis, pathology, and treatment among humans and animals; and discuss the ecology of Lyme and other emerging tick-borne diseases in the United States.

9:00am | "Advancing Veterinary Knowledge on Lyme Disease in the Potomac Region"
Human cases of Lyme disease are increasing in the Potomac region, but what do we know about the patterns of disease in our canine companions? this presentation will discuss ongoing research at the Virginia-Maryland College of Veterinary Medicine on Lyme disease, and offer an opportunity for private practitioners to get involved.

Dr. Angela Kargus
10:05am | "Introduction to Working with the Media"
Veterinarians often underestimate the role the media can play in helping them communicate with current – and potential – clients. Seminar attendees will learn how to develop a key message, give an effective media interview, and how to effectively utilize select social media platforms. There will also be a discussion on handling emotional and controversial industry topics in the public arena.

Those completing this seminar will be able to:

  • Understand how the media has changed in recent years
  • Be prepared and strategic about telling their government’s story
  • Use social media effectively
  • Plan a communication strategy
  • Respond to unwelcome media attention
  • Give an effective interview
  • Improve communication style
  • Cultivate relationships with traditional media
  • Focus on key messages


3801 Westerre Parkway, Suite D
Henrico, Virginia 23233
(800) 937-8862  – toll free
(804) 346-2611  – local
(804) 346-2655  – fax
robin@vvma.org
talya@vvma.org

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